Monthly Archives: December 2012

We are receiving reports of problems with BitPerfect 1.0.4’s Permissions Scan process with iTunes 11.  As you may already know, BitPerfect 1.0.4 was submitted to the App store for approval long before iTunes 11 was released, and it has not therefore been pre-tested with iTunes 11.  Unfortunately, we are quite unable to reproduce any of these problems on any of our own systems.  We are therefore in the process of collating as much data and customer feedback as we can, and hopefully we will be able to identify the root cause as soon as possible.

Once we know what the cause is, we can determine the best course of action.  Stay tuned.

UPDATE:  Some (but not all) users are reporting that the problem can be resolved by quitting BitPerfect, and launching iTunes manually.  Then, once iTunes has had a chance to get itself fully up to speed, stating BitPerfect again and running the Permissions Scan manually (click on “Change Music Directory” in BitPerfect’s status bar menu).

UPDATE:  Thanks to BitPerfect user Bill Riel for pointing this out:  “Like many others I had quite a bit of difficulty getting BitPerfect 1.0.4 to scan my library when using iTunes 11.  It seemed that no matter what I did, at best BitPerfect would start the scan, then immediately shut down before finishing.  I just tried something a bit different: I had iTunes already open **and playing some music**.  I then launched BitPerfect while iTunes was playing, and this time, the scan was successful. I then quit iTunes from the BitPerfect menu, re-launched it and things appear to be functioning as they should.”  We have a lot of very helpful users out there.

UPDATE:  With BitPerfect 1.0.5 we now have an additional option to execute the Permissions Scan manually.  Please read the revised User Manual for more details.

We are receiving reports of problems with BitPerfect 1.0.4’s Permissions Scan process with iTunes 11.  As you may already know, BitPerfect 1.0.4 was submitted to the App store for approval long before iTunes 11 was released, and it has not therefore been pre-tested with iTunes 11.  Unfortunately, we are quite unable to reproduce any of these problems on any of our own systems.  We are therefore in the process of collating as much data and customer feedback as we can, and hopefully we will be able to identify the root cause as soon as possible.

Once we know what the cause is, we can determine the best course of action.  Stay tuned.

UPDATE:  Some (but not all) users are reporting that the problem can be resolved by quitting BitPerfect, and launching iTunes manually.  Then, once iTunes has had a chance to get itself fully up to speed, stating BitPerfect again and running the Permissions Scan manually (click on “Change Music Directory” in BitPerfect’s status bar menu).

UPDATE:  Thanks to BitPerfect user Bill Riel for pointing this out:  “Like many others I had quite a bit of difficulty getting BitPerfect 1.0.4 to scan my library when using iTunes 11.  It seemed that no matter what I did, at best BitPerfect would start the scan, then immediately shut down before finishing.  I just tried something a bit different: I had iTunes already open **and playing some music**.  I then launched BitPerfect while iTunes was playing, and this time, the scan was successful. I then quit iTunes from the BitPerfect menu, re-launched it and things appear to be functioning as they should.”  We have a lot of very helpful users out there.

UPDATE:  With BitPerfect 1.0.5 we now have an additional option to execute the Permissions Scan manually.  Please read the revised User Manual for more details.

BitPerfect 1.0.4 has been released to the App Store.  This version includes new features for managing AirPlay Devices, and a number of minor bug fixes.  It also introduces a new requirement for compliance with Apple’s new App Store posting requirements.

  • Users must grant specific permission to BitPerfect to permit access to music files (on first launch only).
  • Feature to stop iTunes defaulting to AirPlay devices.
  •  Icon color changes to reflect playback status.
  • “Retina Display” support.
  • Fix for broken Volume Control with certain DACs.
  • Fix for some small bugs that affect gapless playback.
  • Fix to correct for channel reversal in AirPlay devices.
  • Option to limit maximum sample rate.
  • Option to reverse channels on individual tracks. 

Please contact us if you have any questions, comments or bug reports!

BitPerfect 1.0.4 has been released to the App Store.  This version includes new features for managing AirPlay Devices, and a number of minor bug fixes.  It also introduces a new requirement for compliance with Apple’s new App Store posting requirements.

  • Users must grant specific permission to BitPerfect to permit access to music files (on first launch only).
  • Feature to stop iTunes defaulting to AirPlay devices.
  •  Icon color changes to reflect playback status.
  • “Retina Display” support.
  • Fix for broken Volume Control with certain DACs.
  • Fix for some small bugs that affect gapless playback.
  • Fix to correct for channel reversal in AirPlay devices.
  • Option to limit maximum sample rate.
  • Option to reverse channels on individual tracks. 

Please contact us if you have any questions, comments or bug reports!

Having strange problems with iTunes 11?   This may sound stupid – and little Windows-ish – but try a cold re-boot after installing iTunes 11 and running it for the first time.

BitPerfect is receiving all sorts of reports of erratic and seemingly unconnected problems after installing iTunes 11.  These problems seem to go away after a hard re-boot.

My own bizarre problem actually required me to re-boot my router!  One or two strange episodes can be viewed as a bizarre coincidence, but frankly, I’ve fielded about a dozen of these today already.

Having strange problems with iTunes 11?   This may sound stupid – and little Windows-ish – but try a cold re-boot after installing iTunes 11 and running it for the first time.

BitPerfect is receiving all sorts of reports of erratic and seemingly unconnected problems after installing iTunes 11.  These problems seem to go away after a hard re-boot.

My own bizarre problem actually required me to re-boot my router!  One or two strange episodes can be viewed as a bizarre coincidence, but frankly, I’ve fielded about a dozen of these today already.

Way back in May, his 9th floor Condo flooded in freak circumstances during a torrential rainstorm, along with about 15 other units in the building.  He was forced to move out while the various insurance companies involved fought among each other over how to perform the repairs.  He and his girlfriend had to live their lives between a hotel room and their parents’ houses.

Repairs took a long, long time. Issues included an insurance company who thought it was a fine idea to replace quality hardwood floors with bargain basement Walmart stock.  They all had to be ripped up and relaid.  Do you remember the Mr. Bean episode where he painted his walls by placing a stick of dynamite in a paint pot on a stool in the centre of the room?  Well, the contractors were forced to re-do their shabby paint job.

Anyway, finally, all of these obstacles are being cleared up, one at a painful time, and we expect him to move back in any day now.

Well, that was Friday’s status. Yesterday, his neighbor moved into his apartment and within an hour the water feed pipe to his dishwasher broke, and flooded his apartment.  Whoever installed it had not installed a shut-off valve.  The water just kept on pouring in. The apartment building was more or less empty, and nobody could be contacted who knew where the master shut-off was located.  Finally Tim was tracked down.  He knew where the shut-off was, and more to the point, had a key to that room.

By the time the drama was over, Tim’s apartment, and about ten or more others had been completely flooded again.  They are right back to square one.

As I said, spare a thought for poor Tim!

 

Way back in May, his 9th floor Condo flooded in freak circumstances during a torrential rainstorm, along with about 15 other units in the building.  He was forced to move out while the various insurance companies involved fought among each other over how to perform the repairs.  He and his girlfriend had to live their lives between a hotel room and their parents’ houses.

Repairs took a long, long time. Issues included an insurance company who thought it was a fine idea to replace quality hardwood floors with bargain basement Walmart stock.  They all had to be ripped up and relaid.  Do you remember the Mr. Bean episode where he painted his walls by placing a stick of dynamite in a paint pot on a stool in the centre of the room?  Well, the contractors were forced to re-do their shabby paint job.

Anyway, finally, all of these obstacles are being cleared up, one at a painful time, and we expect him to move back in any day now.

Well, that was Friday’s status. Yesterday, his neighbor moved into his apartment and within an hour the water feed pipe to his dishwasher broke, and flooded his apartment.  Whoever installed it had not installed a shut-off valve.  The water just kept on pouring in. The apartment building was more or less empty, and nobody could be contacted who knew where the master shut-off was located.  Finally Tim was tracked down.  He knew where the shut-off was, and more to the point, had a key to that room.

By the time the drama was over, Tim’s apartment, and about ten or more others had been completely flooded again.  They are right back to square one.

As I said, spare a thought for poor Tim!

 

Karl Jenkins is a contemporary Welsh composer, arguably the most popular living composer specializing in large-scale choral works.  “The Armed Man: A Mass For Peace” is his most popular work, and has been performed over 1,000 times.

http://www.adiemus.f2s.com/armedmanrev.htm

The Catholic Mass is a traditional vehicle for choral composers.  At one time, the Church, and Church-based events, were the primary source of commissions for choral works, both large-scale and small.  Bach, Beethoven, Mozart, Haydn, even Berlioz and Verdi all composed high masses of great renown.  Today, the Mass – in fact the whole body of high-church liturgy – is still a go-to setting for the serious choral composer, simply because, like the symphony, it is a standard musical form where the composer can exercise his chops without alienating the potential audience with an unfamiliar framework.

Karl Jenkins writes in the so-called “crossover” style, where the flowing melody lines and friendly harmonic structures of popular music replace the dissonance, atonality, and temporal chaos of many schools of 20th Century composition.  Crossover composers are often dismissed contemptuously within the academic circles of musical intellectuals, but audiences can seldom be found for works where it is hard to tell when the tuning-up has finished and the performance commenced, whereas composers like Jenkins, John Rutter, and John Williams routinely fill the concert halls.  Those of you old enough may remember the Jazz-Rock fusion group “Nucleus” of the early 1970’s.  Jenkins was in the band, playing keyboards and saxophone.  He also played for many years with the prog-rock band “Soft Machine“.

The Armed Man: A Mass For Peace” is a terrifically accessible work, yet for all its clean lines, traditional structure and tonal beauty it still brings something new for the skeptical listener.  Here we have – what? – a traditional Islamic “call to prayers” to kick off a Catholic Mass!  We also hear texts from Indian Hindu and Japanese Shinto sources, as well as verses by Kipling, Tennyson, and even the Master of the Royal Armories of Great Britain (actually, the Royal Armories commissioned the work).  It all comes together with great cohesion.  The concluding track “Better is Peace (than all that war)” is one that you will find yourself whistling for a long time.

Jenkins dedicated the work to the victims of the genocide in Kosovo.  Although it was written in 2000, it will of course be listened to in the context of the post 9/11 world and its need to find functioning social philosophies in the face of apparently irreconcilable forces of religious – and, yes, political – fundamentalism.  “The Armed Man: A Mass For Peace” can only give us hope.

 

Karl Jenkins is a contemporary Welsh composer, arguably the most popular living composer specializing in large-scale choral works.  “The Armed Man: A Mass For Peace” is his most popular work, and has been performed over 1,000 times.

http://www.adiemus.f2s.com/armedmanrev.htm

The Catholic Mass is a traditional vehicle for choral composers.  At one time, the Church, and Church-based events, were the primary source of commissions for choral works, both large-scale and small.  Bach, Beethoven, Mozart, Haydn, even Berlioz and Verdi all composed high masses of great renown.  Today, the Mass – in fact the whole body of high-church liturgy – is still a go-to setting for the serious choral composer, simply because, like the symphony, it is a standard musical form where the composer can exercise his chops without alienating the potential audience with an unfamiliar framework.

Karl Jenkins writes in the so-called “crossover” style, where the flowing melody lines and friendly harmonic structures of popular music replace the dissonance, atonality, and temporal chaos of many schools of 20th Century composition.  Crossover composers are often dismissed contemptuously within the academic circles of musical intellectuals, but audiences can seldom be found for works where it is hard to tell when the tuning-up has finished and the performance commenced, whereas composers like Jenkins, John Rutter, and John Williams routinely fill the concert halls.  Those of you old enough may remember the Jazz-Rock fusion group “Nucleus” of the early 1970’s.  Jenkins was in the band, playing keyboards and saxophone.  He also played for many years with the prog-rock band “Soft Machine“.

The Armed Man: A Mass For Peace” is a terrifically accessible work, yet for all its clean lines, traditional structure and tonal beauty it still brings something new for the skeptical listener.  Here we have – what? – a traditional Islamic “call to prayers” to kick off a Catholic Mass!  We also hear texts from Indian Hindu and Japanese Shinto sources, as well as verses by Kipling, Tennyson, and even the Master of the Royal Armories of Great Britain (actually, the Royal Armories commissioned the work).  It all comes together with great cohesion.  The concluding track “Better is Peace (than all that war)” is one that you will find yourself whistling for a long time.

Jenkins dedicated the work to the victims of the genocide in Kosovo.  Although it was written in 2000, it will of course be listened to in the context of the post 9/11 world and its need to find functioning social philosophies in the face of apparently irreconcilable forces of religious – and, yes, political – fundamentalism.  “The Armed Man: A Mass For Peace” can only give us hope.